Indignados: One year on, re-lauch from Puerta del Sol

Mobiliisitation goes on, this time global

11 May, 20:40

Indignados invade che centre of Madrid Indignados invade che centre of Madrid

(ANSAmed) - MADRID - The 'Spanish revolution', born as it happens at Puerta del Sol on Saturday May 15 2011, has since become a 'global revolution', spreading across the entire planet and bringing millions of young people onto the streets of cities from London to New York, from Athens to Calcutta, from Rome to Paris.

One year on from its beginning, there has been a return to the place where that first spark detonated the worldwide movement, to Madrid's most emblematic central square.

The Indignados have convened a great gathering for Saturday at 'kilometre zero', from all of Spain's streets. Demonstrations have been scheduled in several other cities around the world, from New York to Rome. In the Spanish capital, four processions will be flowing towards Sol, with tens of thousands of people expected in the square in the afternoon. One year ago, the square was home for one month to a 'free citadel' of young Spaniards.

In Barcelona, the Indignados were already on the march on Friday, with the intention of camping in Plaza Catalunya for some days. Unlike last year, these processions and gatherings at Puerta del Sol have been authorised by the Prefect of Madrid.

But the authorisation will last only up until 10pm, while the Indignados were planning to remain at least until midnight, and maybe even to pitch tents once again. A large contingent of police has been deployed by the authorities: there is even word of 3,000 riot police.

In Spain the political scenario has now changed. Last year, the country was under the leadership of Socialist Jose' Luis Zapatero, who showed a great deal of tolerance for the demonstrators, letting them set up camp in Sol until June 12. In government is now under Mariano Rajoy. It is unlikely that he will be as lenient, when the country is even deeper into recession.

The protest movement that spread across the planet from last October, with spectacular occupations of Wall Street and of St Paul's Cathedral in London, has over past months lost much of its impetus in Spain. But there remains the backdrop of protest around the globe by young people against a society 'without hope', made up of permanent employment insecurity and with a large part of the country against political corruption and 'collusion' between politicians and bankers. Their model remains that of the 'Icelandic Revolution'. Sol Square awaits them: the historic place, now clean and tidy, bears little resemblance to the revolutionary campsite of a year ago, where among the dozens of sky-blue tents a kind of new May 1968 could be felt, with every surface being used for self-expression. (ANSAmed).

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