Italy-Egypt: Maurizio Massari nominated Ambassador to Cairo

23 January, 16:45

(ANSAmed) - ROME, JANUARY 23 - Maurizio Massari was nominated the new Italian Ambassador to Cairo. So announced the Foreign Ministry upon receiving approval from the Egyptian government for the Italian Cabinet's nomination.

Fifty-three-year-old Massari has been the Foreign Ministry's Middle East envoy since 2012, after holding numerous positions and serving in several embassies throughout the world. In Moscow from 1986 to 1990, during the years of 'perestroika', he was press attache tasked with Soviet domestic policy affairs.

Massari was then stationed in London (1991-1994) in the economic-commercial and European policies sector and acted as political advisor in Washington during the Clinton administration's second term (1998-2001). He worked alongside Ambassador Silvio Fagiolo in 1996-1997 during the negotiations for the revision of the Maastricht Treaty and - after serving as head of the Foreign Ministry's Balkans Office in the post-Milosevic period (2001-2002)- he was designated OECD ambassador in Serbia and Montenegro (2003-2006). He went on to direct the Foreign Ministry's Analysis and Planning Unit and was Press Chief and Foreign Ministry Spokesman between January 2009 and January 2012. With a fellowship at Harvard University's International Affairs Institute, a degree in Political Science (Naples) and one in International Public Policies (John's Hopkins University of Washington) Massari taught International Relations at Rome's Sapienza University between 2006 and 2007. He has authored two books: one on the USSR ('La Grande Svolta', published by Guida, 1990) and post-war Russia ('Russia: Democrazia Europea o Potenza Globale', Guerini, 2009) as well as contributing to a book on the recent uprisings in the Arab world ('Le Rivoluzioni della Dignita'', Ediesse 2012). He has also published numerous articles and essays on international policy in both Italian and foreign specialised publications. (ANSAmed).

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